Install Theme

Science Today is a daily radio feature produced by the University of California for the CBS Radio Network. From breakthroughs in medicine, agriculture and the environment to insights into the world around us, Science Today covers it all.

Posts tagged with ‘science’

Being honest, even when it may be advantageous to lie, takes more self-control. Those were the findings of a new study led by Ming Hsu of UC Berkeley. They linked damage to the brain’s prefrontal cortex, a region that controls impulses, to an inability to control self-interests.

Hsu says the study involved a money-splitting game between participants with damage to their prefrontal region and those with healthy brains.
 

So, you tell them either option A is better than option B for you or option B is better than option A for you. So essentially this will be like saying, car A is really good for you, even though when I know car B is really the better one for you. What we found is that people who don’t have damage to this brain region are willing to sacrifice quite a bit of material interest in order to not have to be dishonest.

This research supports the hypothesis that humans are inherently self-interested.
 

People like economists and behavioral ecologists have long argued that self-interest is the basic impulses of human behavior.

It’s National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. The University of California-managed California Breast Cancer Research Program (CBCRP) works year-round to raise awareness and fund research that strives to uncover the many factors that may contribute to the disease. This includes toxicological testing to detect chemical contributors to breast cancer risk.
This video highlights some of the community outreach and research that’s funded by the CBCRP,.

It’s National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. The University of California-managed California Breast Cancer Research Program (CBCRP) works year-round to raise awareness and fund research that strives to uncover the many factors that may contribute to the disease. This includes toxicological testing to detect chemical contributors to breast cancer risk.

This video highlights some of the community outreach and research that’s funded by the CBCRP,.

Astronomers observe a supernovae within hours of the explosion

For the first time ever, scientists have gathered direct evidence of a rare Wolf-Rayet star being linked to a specific type of stellar explosion known as a Type IIb supernova. Peter Nugent of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory talks to us about this star:

We never had a nearby example where we could say, ‘oh this star became this supernova.’ So this was the first time we can directly point to it and say because we heated up this wind and because we could see the wind that looks just like a Wolf-Rayet star, we know that the Wolf-Rayet star blew up and then became this type of supernova.

Nugent says they caught this star – a whopping 360 million light years away – just a few hours after it exploded.