Install Theme

Science Today is a daily radio feature produced by the University of California for the CBS Radio Network. From breakthroughs in medicine, agriculture and the environment to insights into the world around us, Science Today covers it all.

Posts tagged with ‘research’

A blood test that’s commonly used to determine whether heart transplant recipients are rejecting their new organ can also serve as a ‘crystal ball’ to predict potential rejection-related problems months into the future. Dr. Mario Deng, study leader and head of UCLA’s integrated heart transplant program, says the AlloMap blood test measures changes in the expression of about a dozen genes over a period of time.

Patients who were clinically stable, who had more than one AlloMap blood test in the same range were seemingly doing really well. In contrast, patients who were not clinically stable and who had an AlloMap blood test that was variable over time had a much more clinically bumpy course.

Before, heart transplant recipients underwent routing monitoring by undergoing an invasive, heart-muscle biopsy. Now, the AlloMap test offers these patients a non-invasive, personalized medicine approach.

We can now systematically tailor the immune-suppression dose to the individual person’s needs and that was not possible before.

For the first time, a study led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists has confirmed that thirdhand smoke, which is the nicotine residue that sticks to surfaces after secondhand smoke clears, causes DNA damage. Staff scientist Lara Gundel and her team are part of a research consortium funded by the University of California’s Tobacco-Related Disease Research Program.

We have a very ambitious agenda that includes not only chemistry and how thirdhand smoke forms and how it reacts, but also affects human exposure and in looking for markers of exposure. It’s very, very important to understand the impact of thirdhand smoke in a way that would affect policy.  So that kind of effort is also included in our research consortium.

Their study found that chronic exposure to thirdhand smoke causes more DNA damage than samples exposed to acute exposure, suggesting that the residue becomes more harmful over time.
Yuck.

For the first time, a study led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists has confirmed that thirdhand smoke, which is the nicotine residue that sticks to surfaces after secondhand smoke clears, causes DNA damage. Staff scientist Lara Gundel and her team are part of a research consortium funded by the University of California’s Tobacco-Related Disease Research Program.

We have a very ambitious agenda that includes not only chemistry and how thirdhand smoke forms and how it reacts, but also affects human exposure and in looking for markers of exposure. It’s very, very important to understand the impact of thirdhand smoke in a way that would affect policy.  So that kind of effort is also included in our research consortium.

Their study found that chronic exposure to thirdhand smoke causes more DNA damage than samples exposed to acute exposure, suggesting that the residue becomes more harmful over time.

Yuck.

(Source: eleym)

By now, you’ve probably filed your taxes (in case you haven’t…um… the deadline is today!). Californians had the option to check off box 405 on the 540 tax form to make a contribution towards the California Breast Cancer Research Program (CBCRP). Managed by the University of California, it’s the nation’s largest state-funded breast cancer research effort. Grants have been given to support a variety of studies, including those looking into chemicals that may be linked to the disease.
We chatted recently with CBCRP director Mhel Kavanaugh-Lynch about the program. 

One of the advantages of the California Breast Cancer Research Program is that we were meant to be innovative and we were meant to take risks. This benefits some of the other research funders around who might have similar ideas but cannot get the permission or the go ahead to try out these ideas. We can serve as a proof of principle. This is one of the ways we think that the California Breast Cancer Research Program can have far-reaching impact, much bigger than the money we give.

Last year, the program granted over $5 million in research awards to advance the knowledge about prevention, detection, treatment and community impact of breast cancer.

By now, you’ve probably filed your taxes (in case you haven’t…um… the deadline is today!). Californians had the option to check off box 405 on the 540 tax form to make a contribution towards the California Breast Cancer Research Program (CBCRP). Managed by the University of California, it’s the nation’s largest state-funded breast cancer research effort. Grants have been given to support a variety of studies, including those looking into chemicals that may be linked to the disease.

We chatted recently with CBCRP director Mhel Kavanaugh-Lynch about the program.

One of the advantages of the California Breast Cancer Research Program is that we were meant to be innovative and we were meant to take risks. This benefits some of the other research funders around who might have similar ideas but cannot get the permission or the go ahead to try out these ideas. We can serve as a proof of principle. This is one of the ways we think that the California Breast Cancer Research Program can have far-reaching impact, much bigger than the money we give.

Last year, the program granted over $5 million in research awards to advance the knowledge about prevention, detection, treatment and community impact of breast cancer.