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Science Today is a daily radio feature produced by the University of California for the CBS Radio Network. From breakthroughs in medicine, agriculture and the environment to insights into the world around us, Science Today covers it all.

Posts tagged with ‘genes’

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Watch how the bicycles of the 1800s influence today’s bikes

In case you need another reason to get out on your bike….we just filed a story about how exercising can actually lengthen telomeres. These are the ends of chromosomes that control cellular aging (they resemble the plastic tips on shoelaces). Until now, it was thought that telomeres could only get shorter due to aging and stress. 

We found that the telomeres actually got longer by almost 10 percent in the group that made lifestyle changes, whereas they got shorter by about 3 percent of the control group. And we also found that the more people change their lifestyle, the longer their telomeres got at any age and that’s a very empowering finding.

Dr. Dean Ornish of UC San Francisco led this small pilot study and hopes it will motivate others to conduct larger, randomized trials to confirm their findings. 
In the meantime, happy trails!

ucresearch:

Watch how the bicycles of the 1800s influence today’s bikes

In case you need another reason to get out on your bike….we just filed a story about how exercising can actually lengthen telomeres. These are the ends of chromosomes that control cellular aging (they resemble the plastic tips on shoelaces). Until now, it was thought that telomeres could only get shorter due to aging and stress.

We found that the telomeres actually got longer by almost 10 percent in the group that made lifestyle changes, whereas they got shorter by about 3 percent of the control group. And we also found that the more people change their lifestyle, the longer their telomeres got at any age and that’s a very empowering finding.

Dr. Dean Ornish of UC San Francisco led this small pilot study and hopes it will motivate others to conduct larger, randomized trials to confirm their findings. 

In the meantime, happy trails!

(Source: vimeo.com)

A blood test that’s commonly used to determine whether heart transplant recipients are rejecting their new organ can also serve as a ‘crystal ball’ to predict potential rejection-related problems months into the future. Dr. Mario Deng, study leader and head of UCLA’s integrated heart transplant program, says the AlloMap blood test measures changes in the expression of about a dozen genes over a period of time.

Patients who were clinically stable, who had more than one AlloMap blood test in the same range were seemingly doing really well. In contrast, patients who were not clinically stable and who had an AlloMap blood test that was variable over time had a much more clinically bumpy course.

Before, heart transplant recipients underwent routing monitoring by undergoing an invasive, heart-muscle biopsy. Now, the AlloMap test offers these patients a non-invasive, personalized medicine approach.

We can now systematically tailor the immune-suppression dose to the individual person’s needs and that was not possible before.