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Science Today is a daily radio feature produced by the University of California for the CBS Radio Network. From breakthroughs in medicine, agriculture and the environment to insights into the world around us, Science Today covers it all.

Posts tagged with ‘evolution’

Maybe this kind of cardio workout is why, despite a high fat diet, polar bears don’t suffer from heart attacks or cardiac arrest?
OK, maybe not…but we are going to interview a UC Berkeley researcher today about her part in a study of polar bears. Postdoc Eline Lorenzen worked with international collaborators to compare their genome to that of the brown bear. The resulting work reveals new insight into adaptations to high-fat diet. 

For polar bears, profound obesity is a benign state. We wanted to understand how they are able to cope with that.”

Stay tuned!

Maybe this kind of cardio workout is why, despite a high fat diet, polar bears don’t suffer from heart attacks or cardiac arrest?

OK, maybe not…but we are going to interview a UC Berkeley researcher today about her part in a study of polar bears. Postdoc Eline Lorenzen worked with international collaborators to compare their genome to that of the brown bear. The resulting work reveals new insight into adaptations to high-fat diet.

For polar bears, profound obesity is a benign state. We wanted to understand how they are able to cope with that.”

Stay tuned!

(Source: pegasusbooks)

There are three problems when it comes to gene therapy - delivery, delivery and delivery.

That’s an old joke in the field, according to University of California, Berkeley researcher Dave Schaffer, who directs the Berkeley Stem Cell Center.

So, our group over the past 12 to 13 years at Berkley has really been trying to work hard on improving the process of delivering therapeutic genes to a patient’s cells so that we can really get up to therapeutic levels of gene delivery and cure diseases. 

In fact, Schaffer recently engineered a virus to deliver corrective genes to damaged eye cells — a process that involved his team creating over 100 million variants of the virus to ensure that they evolved one that was best suited for gene therapy.

The biggest surprise, which perhaps shouldn’t have been a surprise, is that evolution works. Meaning that every single time we try to apply this approach, this directed evolution of the virus to treat or to overcome a new problem with gene delivery, it’s worked almost better than what we’d hoped for. 

Right on!