Install Theme

Science Today is a daily radio feature produced by the University of California for the CBS Radio Network. From breakthroughs in medicine, agriculture and the environment to insights into the world around us, Science Today covers it all.

Posts tagged with ‘cognition’

ucresearch:

Possessive puppies: Jealous behaviors in dogs
Emotion researchers have been arguing for years whether jealousy requires complex cognition. And some scientists have even said that jealousy is an entirely social construct — not seen in all human cultures and not fundamental or hard-wired in the same ways that fear and anger are.
A current study by UC San Diego professor Christine Harris is the first experimental test of jealous behaviors in dogs. The findings support the view that there may be a more basic form of jealousy, which evolved to protect social bonds from interlopers.
“Our study suggests not only that dogs do engage in what appear to be jealous behaviors but also that they were seeking to break up the connection between the owner and a seeming rival,” Harris said. “We can’t really speak to the dogs’ subjective experiences, of course, but it looks as though they were motivated to protect an important social relationship.”
Read more →

Kittehs canz be jealoos, too …

ucresearch:

Possessive puppies: Jealous behaviors in dogs


Emotion researchers have been arguing for years whether jealousy requires complex cognition. And some scientists have even said that jealousy is an entirely social construct — not seen in all human cultures and not fundamental or hard-wired in the same ways that fear and anger are.

A current study by UC San Diego professor Christine Harris is the first experimental test of jealous behaviors in dogs. The findings support the view that there may be a more basic form of jealousy, which evolved to protect social bonds from interlopers.

“Our study suggests not only that dogs do engage in what appear to be jealous behaviors but also that they were seeking to break up the connection between the owner and a seeming rival,” Harris said. “We can’t really speak to the dogs’ subjective experiences, of course, but it looks as though they were motivated to protect an important social relationship.”

Read more

Kittehs canz be jealoos, too …

If you were to translate ‘Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall’ in another language, a lot depends on what language you’re speaking. Cognitive scientist Lera Boroditsky of UC San Diego explains.

Let’s just focus on the verb ‘sat’. If this is something you want to say in English and it’s something that happened in the past, then you have to change the verb to mark tense. But in other languages, not only do you have to mark tense, there may be five different past tenses.

In other languages, gender and how you even came to know this information about Mr. Dumpty are factored in, too. The cognition behind language got Boroditsky interested in whether bilinguals have two separate systems for thinking in two languages or, do they have one integrated system for both? She found it’s actually a combination of the two.

They may change based on the language they’re speaking in the moment, but they’re almost always still different from the monolinguals of either language. So, it seems that there’s both combination and differentiation in the bilingual mind.

What about you? Do you speak more than one language?

If you were to translate ‘Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall’ in another language, a lot depends on what language you’re speaking. Cognitive scientist Lera Boroditsky of UC San Diego explains.

Let’s just focus on the verb ‘sat’. If this is something you want to say in English and it’s something that happened in the past, then you have to change the verb to mark tense. But in other languages, not only do you have to mark tense, there may be five different past tenses.

In other languages, gender and how you even came to know this information about Mr. Dumpty are factored in, too. The cognition behind language got Boroditsky interested in whether bilinguals have two separate systems for thinking in two languages or, do they have one integrated system for both? She found it’s actually a combination of the two.

They may change based on the language they’re speaking in the moment, but they’re almost always still different from the monolinguals of either language. So, it seems that there’s both combination and differentiation in the bilingual mind.

What about you? Do you speak more than one language?

A UC Santa Cruz study found that dancers can improve the ability to do complex moves by walking through them slowly and encoding the movement with a cue through ‘marking’.
Researcher Edward Warburton, a former professional ballet dancer, and colleagues (including a UC Irvine collaborator) were interested in exploring the “thinking behind the doing of dance.”
Their findings suggest that marking may alleviate the conflict between the cognitive and physical aspects of dance practice and allow dancers to memorize and repeat steps more fluidly. As Warburton describes:

Marking could be strategically used by teachers and choreographers to enhance memory and integration of multiple aspects of a piece precisely at those times when dancers are working to master the most demanding material.

It’s possible that this area of research can extend to other kinds of activities, like language acquisition. Stay tuned!

A UC Santa Cruz study found that dancers can improve the ability to do complex moves by walking through them slowly and encoding the movement with a cue through ‘marking’.

Researcher Edward Warburton, a former professional ballet dancer, and colleagues (including a UC Irvine collaborator) were interested in exploring the “thinking behind the doing of dance.”

Their findings suggest that marking may alleviate the conflict between the cognitive and physical aspects of dance practice and allow dancers to memorize and repeat steps more fluidly. As Warburton describes:

Marking could be strategically used by teachers and choreographers to enhance memory and integration of multiple aspects of a piece precisely at those times when dancers are working to master the most demanding material.

It’s possible that this area of research can extend to other kinds of activities, like language acquisition. Stay tuned!

(Source: cinyma)