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Science Today is a daily radio feature produced by the University of California for the CBS Radio Network. From breakthroughs in medicine, agriculture and the environment to insights into the world around us, Science Today covers it all.

Posts tagged with ‘biology’

Is that a muddied polar bear? Actually, it’s believed to be a pizzly bear (also known as a grolar bear) - a rare hybrid between a polar bear and a grizzly bear. We chatted with ucberkeley biologist Eline Lorenzen about her work studying the genome of the polar bear in the Arctic and while she has yet to see a pizzly bear in the wild, she hopes their work looking into the polar bear genome will one day offer more insight into the pizzly. We’ll be posting a full interview with Lorenzen soon. Stay tuned!

Is that a muddied polar bear? Actually, it’s believed to be a pizzly bear (also known as a grolar bear) - a rare hybrid between a polar bear and a grizzly bear. We chatted with ucberkeley biologist Eline Lorenzen about her work studying the genome of the polar bear in the Arctic and while she has yet to see a pizzly bear in the wild, she hopes their work looking into the polar bear genome will one day offer more insight into the pizzly. We’ll be posting a full interview with Lorenzen soon. Stay tuned!

Bio-inspired materials essentially use Mother Nature as a guide. Materials scientist Joanna McKittrick of the University of California, San Diego’s Jacobs School of Engineering is interested in making new materials that have enhanced mechanical properties.

"And one way to do that is to look at how Mother Nature has created structures such as antlers or horns or porcupine quills, looking at feathers for example for lightweight structures. Same thing with the porcupine quills. Antlers and animal horns are impact resistant so they can absorb a lot of energy before they break. And that would be good for making bumpers or kneepads or helmets. "

Recently, McKittrick’s team has been inspired by the seahorse.

"The surprising thing about the seahorse is its tail. It can wrap and it can bend, it can curl up, but it can also curl to the sides. So it is very flexible and we thought wow that would make a good probe; that would make a good robot arm."

You just never know who you’re going to meet ….

At a restaurant about a year ago, we happened to be seated next to a like-minded foodie and began a conversation about what was on our plates. Turns out that person was UCLA’s Amy Rowat, an integrated biologist who has been making a lot of waves with her innovative scienceandfood program. Our ucresearch production team made sure to look her up during a SoCal trip.