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Science Today is a daily radio feature produced by the University of California for the CBS Radio Network. From breakthroughs in medicine, agriculture and the environment to insights into the world around us, Science Today covers it all.

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Possessive puppies: Jealous behaviors in dogs
Emotion researchers have been arguing for years whether jealousy requires complex cognition. And some scientists have even said that jealousy is an entirely social construct — not seen in all human cultures and not fundamental or hard-wired in the same ways that fear and anger are.
A current study by UC San Diego professor Christine Harris is the first experimental test of jealous behaviors in dogs. The findings support the view that there may be a more basic form of jealousy, which evolved to protect social bonds from interlopers.
“Our study suggests not only that dogs do engage in what appear to be jealous behaviors but also that they were seeking to break up the connection between the owner and a seeming rival,” Harris said. “We can’t really speak to the dogs’ subjective experiences, of course, but it looks as though they were motivated to protect an important social relationship.”
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Kittehs canz be jealoos, too …

ucresearch:

Possessive puppies: Jealous behaviors in dogs


Emotion researchers have been arguing for years whether jealousy requires complex cognition. And some scientists have even said that jealousy is an entirely social construct — not seen in all human cultures and not fundamental or hard-wired in the same ways that fear and anger are.

A current study by UC San Diego professor Christine Harris is the first experimental test of jealous behaviors in dogs. The findings support the view that there may be a more basic form of jealousy, which evolved to protect social bonds from interlopers.

“Our study suggests not only that dogs do engage in what appear to be jealous behaviors but also that they were seeking to break up the connection between the owner and a seeming rival,” Harris said. “We can’t really speak to the dogs’ subjective experiences, of course, but it looks as though they were motivated to protect an important social relationship.”

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Kittehs canz be jealoos, too …

Bio-inspired materials essentially use Mother Nature as a guide. Materials scientist Joanna McKittrick of the University of California, San Diego’s Jacobs School of Engineering is interested in making new materials that have enhanced mechanical properties.

"And one way to do that is to look at how Mother Nature has created structures such as antlers or horns or porcupine quills, looking at feathers for example for lightweight structures. Same thing with the porcupine quills. Antlers and animal horns are impact resistant so they can absorb a lot of energy before they break. And that would be good for making bumpers or kneepads or helmets. "

Recently, McKittrick’s team has been inspired by the seahorse.

"The surprising thing about the seahorse is its tail. It can wrap and it can bend, it can curl up, but it can also curl to the sides. So it is very flexible and we thought wow that would make a good probe; that would make a good robot arm."