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Science Today is a daily radio feature produced by the University of California for the CBS Radio Network. From breakthroughs in medicine, agriculture and the environment to insights into the world around us, Science Today covers it all.

Posts tagged with ‘UC Berkeley’

Imagine one of these coming you way?
Evolutionary biologist Robert Dudley of the UC Berkeley says that newborn birds exhibit the same types of asymmetric movement that these animals create to glide and maneuver in mid-air, which he says supports the hypothesis that birds developed flight by falling from trees. 

Gliding snakes in Southeast Asia, gliding lizards - they’re all highly maneuverable. These are not like paper airplane, launch and glide to target.  No, they can take off and land on the same tree that they jumped off of. They can do 180s in midair.  They can avoid things. So from day one, all of these gliders actually are highly maneuverable and they carry out those maneuvers by moving their aerodynamic structures asymmetrically, not symmetrically.  So it’s another very important argument in support of aerial hypotheses for the origins of bird flight is that basically everything that’s going aerial is maneuverable from day one.

Imagine one of these coming you way?

Evolutionary biologist Robert Dudley of the UC Berkeley says that newborn birds exhibit the same types of asymmetric movement that these animals create to glide and maneuver in mid-air, which he says supports the hypothesis that birds developed flight by falling from trees.

Gliding snakes in Southeast Asia, gliding lizards - they’re all highly maneuverable. These are not like paper airplane, launch and glide to target.  No, they can take off and land on the same tree that they jumped off of. They can do 180s in midair.  They can avoid things. So from day one, all of these gliders actually are highly maneuverable and they carry out those maneuvers by moving their aerodynamic structures asymmetrically, not symmetrically.  So it’s another very important argument in support of aerial hypotheses for the origins of bird flight is that basically everything that’s going aerial is maneuverable from day one.

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via 4gifs)

Being honest, even when it may be advantageous to lie, takes more self-control. Those were the findings of a new study led by Ming Hsu of UC Berkeley. They linked damage to the brain’s prefrontal cortex, a region that controls impulses, to an inability to control self-interests.

Hsu says the study involved a money-splitting game between participants with damage to their prefrontal region and those with healthy brains.
 

So, you tell them either option A is better than option B for you or option B is better than option A for you. So essentially this will be like saying, car A is really good for you, even though when I know car B is really the better one for you. What we found is that people who don’t have damage to this brain region are willing to sacrifice quite a bit of material interest in order to not have to be dishonest.

This research supports the hypothesis that humans are inherently self-interested.
 

People like economists and behavioral ecologists have long argued that self-interest is the basic impulses of human behavior.